How much does it cost to own a private jet?

Alasdair Whyte
By Alasdair Whyte September 5, 2010 22:48
How Corprorate Jet Investor analyses aircraft, and how to work out how much it costs to own a business jet.

As well as knowing how much it costs to buy a business jet,  it is important to know how much it will cost you to operate the aircraft.

There are three types of cost that prospective owners should be aware of:

  • Acquisition cost – how much you are paying for the aircraft, broker fees, legal fees
  • Fixed costs or ownership costs – pilots and crew salaries and training, airport parking, monthly management fees
  • Flying or direct costs – fuel, maintenance, air traffic control fees, landing charges

Whilst every effort has been made to provide realistic data, some figures are based on Corporate Jet Investor estimates in line with industry practice. The figures should not be used as a basis for commercial decisions. It should also be noted that using the figures to make comparisons between aircraft in different categories could be misleading, as different assumptions are made for different categories (in particular utilisation).


How to use our aircraft guides

Type: Some aircraft are variants of earlier ones; this bit specifies the type we are covering.

Passengers (crew): This figure is intended as a guide. The numbers vary greatly by configuration. The number of seats is generally the same in each class – so, a mid-size aircraft typically carries eight passengers plus two pilots; a super-mid carries eight to 10 passengers plus two crew.

Cabin cubic size: This gives you a quick guide to how spacious each aircraft is.

Range:
We give this in kilometres and normal (or statute) miles as it is easier for most non-pilots to gauge distances this way. Range in nautical miles is included in the technical specifications for each aircraft.

Maximum speed mph/kmph/mach:
Although mach is technical we include this as many people know that Concorde flew at

Recommended cruise: While maximum speed is nice, this is the speed that jets probably travel at.

Competitor aircraft:
We list the aircraft this jet normally competes with and include similar models from the same manufacturer.


Buyer’s guide

Total cost for fully fitted new jet: $
Aircraft prices are based on the manufacturer’s data when available and on additional Corporate Jet Investor research. The price reflects an aircraft equipped to an average standard. Buyers could easily exceed this, depending on interior choice and avionics.

Yearly ownership cost:

Hourly operating cost: This includes  yearly ownership costs

Yearly operating cost: This includes  yearly ownership costs
We make several assumptions here and it is important that buyers are aware of these.

Assumed annual hours flown

In an attempt to provide representative costs, the assumed hours flown are varied according to the category of aircraft, in line with our view of typical operations for that category. The assumptions are as follows:

(They are somewhat arbitrary, but some distinction is required)

Category (jet)

Abbreviation

Assumed annual hours flown (Utilisation)

Personal (very light )

VLJ

150

Business liner

BL

1,200

Light/Medium

LMJ

450

Medium/Large

MLJ

600

Large

LJ

900

Long Range

LRJ

1,200

Pilot costs: Two pilot crews are assumed for all aircraft, even where certification permits single crew operation, as this reflects the most typical situation. The exception is VLJs, where single pilot operation is assumed. These costs can vary greatly by region.

Average fuel burn: Average fuel burn (lb/hour) is based on manufacturer data (where available) and Corporate Jet Investor estimates.

Maintenance costs: Costs are based on aircraft and engine manufacturer published programmes where available. Where such data is not available, numbers are based on factoring with aircraft weight and engine power.
Potential buyers of aircraft can fix these by using manufacturer support packages. These are very customisable and may cost more, depending on the level and speed of support chosen.


Investor’s guide

First delivery: When the first aircraft was delivered, not test flight.
World fleet:
Generally the more aircraft that are flying, the easier it is to re-market an aircraft.
Investor poll:
How do lenders view it?

Fractional ownership costs: Wherever possible, we will list fractional rates for each aircraft.

Aircraft specifications: You can get full technical specifications by clicking here.
Aircraft manufacturer:
Engine manufacturer:
Engine type (number):
A general rule is that the more engines an aircraft has, the higher its maintenance costs,

These are just a summary. You can get full technical data by clicking on the link at the bottom.

We welcome comments and regularly update data and the model, so please contact us on awhyte@corpjetinvestor.com or call +44 (0)1737 844 383

Alasdair Whyte
By Alasdair Whyte September 5, 2010 22:48

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