Silver with a red stripe: VistaJet’s marketing advantage

Alasdair Whyte
By Alasdair Whyte July 12, 2017 16:19

Silver with a red stripe: VistaJet’s marketing advantage

Tequila baron, Nespresso drinker and actor George Clooney has flown on a lot of business jets. But when he and his wife chose to fly to Lake Como last week they flew VistaJet.

VistaJet never reveals customer names, but when the paparazzi snapped Clooney walking down the steps of a grey aircraft with red stripes it was clear that he had flown on VistaJet. VistaJet also makes sure its logo is clearly visible next to the door for anyone who is not familiar with the brand.

The Clooney family join a long line of other VistaJet celebrity customers that have been snapped in front of the operator’s grey aircraft. Others include Beyonce and David Beckham (pictured).

It is not always the paparazzi that spreads the news. Many celebrities take pictures of themselves next to the aircraft for their own social media campaigns. VistaJet’s distinctive interiors also make it easy for its customers to see who else is flying on the operator.

“VistaJet’s branding can help sell when selling their pre-owned aircraft as well,” says Jahid Fazal-Karim, co-owner of aircraft broker Jetcraft which has a lot of expertise in selling aircraft for fleet operators. “In addition they tend to generate sales from clients that have flown their planes. then want to buy a VistaJet interior or spec type airplane. The same also applies to NetJets in the US.”

Although the standard livery has a marketing benefit. The reasons for it are deeper. Thomas Flohr, the founder of VistaJet, wanted to create standardised luxury for business jet travellers.

“I added these aircraft because of a master strategic plan to cover the globe with silver metallic planes with a red stripe, identical in type, identical performance, identical service in the cabin, to give our clients a true alternative to ownership,” says Flohr, “and that’s what we have achieved.”


An in-depth interview with Thomas Flohr will be published tomorrow 

 

Alasdair Whyte
By Alasdair Whyte July 12, 2017 16:19